About More with LeSS: A Decade of Descaling with Large-Scale Scrum

We were fortunate in June to have Craig Larman, co-creator of Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS), speak to our group. The main goal of LeSS is not to enable traditional big groups to “meet their commitment” more efficiently—it is to see the ineffectiveness of traditional large-scale organizational design and to change it, by descaling with LeSS towards a simple model for multiple teams that optimizes for agility (flexibility), learning, and flow of value. Change the organization before you expect workers to change.

LeSS is scaled Scrum. It is about applying the principles and ideas of Scrum to many teams working together on one product. These include empirical process control, shippable product every sprint (which heightens transparency, creates a strong feedback loop, and allows early delivery of value), and self-managing teams — including self-management between the teams that are working together on one product. LeSS, like Scrum, contains very few elements. This is very intentional. Because of the need for strong empirical process control and learning, and the vast array of situationally different groups, a one-size-fits-all or detailed prescriptive framework doesn’t really address the root issues. So there’s more learning and adaptation with less defined processes, and that’s a good thing. Hence the slogan, “More with LeSS.”

To learn more about Large-Scale Scrum, visit http://less.works Our members found Craig’s presentation to be thought-provoking, and it gave them new ways of looking at organizational agility.  Our conversations have been greatly influenced by the ideas shared, and at least a few took ideas back to their own organizations right away–signs of a great user group meeting!

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